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I’m excited to announce the release of my latest book, No-Bone Zone: The Ins and Outs of Curing Long-Term Relationship Boredom. This book has been in conceptual development since my days as an undergraduate psychology student studying to be a human sexuality researcher, but became a realized dream about six months ago. Like The Barefoot Running Book, Never Wipe Your Ass with a Squirrel, Must Have Been Another Earthquake, Kids (a book about full-time RV living with children), and The Ultimate Guide to Trail Running and Ultramarathons (which was released about a month ago,) No-Bone Zone takes the idea of creative self-experimentation with unorthodox ideas and utilizes it to make our sex and relationship adventures more interesting, exciting, and fulfilling.
Here’s the official description:

So you and your significant other used to go at it like rabbits, but now your sex life has cooled off and you have entered the dreaded No-Bone Zone. How do you fix your mismatched sex drives and recapture some of that early magic?

 

As a sex and relationship blogger, this is one of the most common issues I have seen long-term couples encounter. Far too many couples struggled with this common issue, especially after children. Pop psychology, relationship counselors, and the self-help community typically offer advice that ultimately exasperates the problem. In other words, we’re doing relationships wrong.

 

No-Bone Zone flushes that viewpoint down the toilet and explores our relationships and the issue of boredom from a different, unconventional, and sometimes controversial perspective. This new perspective allows us to create long-term solutions that can save our relationships. No-Bone Zone fuses emerging hard science with easy to understand language and outside-the-box thinking to produce an entirely new framework for making our relationships last.

The first few sections of the book are available as a sample, which can be downloaded here:

 

The book is currently available exclusively via Amazon, and is being published as a dead tree paperback version and a Kindle ebook version.

Questions? Leave a comment and I’ll answer it as soon as possible.
Enjoy!
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For about a year or so, I’ve been a part-time stay-at-home parent. Each Tuesday and Thursday, I’m home alone with our recently-turned five year old.

And it seriously sucks.

He’s our most talkative, outgoing kid. Over the course of the ten or so hours I’m alone with him, he won’t go more than ten minutes without interacting with me in some way. He narrates every action, verbalizes every thought. Our other children did the same, but they’re rather introverted themselves. Eventually they would hole up somewhere around the house for their own solitude. Not our youngest, though.

And it seriously sucks.

As a moderate introvert, I love interacting with people… for awhile. Eventually I need silence. I need solitude. I need to shut the outside world out. If I don’t get that down time, I begin to lose my mind. I become anxious, agitated, and easily annoyed. I can’t concentrate (which is not cool for a writer.) I start questioning my decision to stay at home. I start fantasizing about escaping somehow.

And it seriously sucks.

Our society likes to champion the idea that parents should always be “on.” We should love every waking moment with our kids. If I had a nickel for every time someone told me to “cherish their youth”, I could afford to place him in preschool full-time.

Our older two are at the age where they can entertain themselves without parental interaction. Hell, the oldest is starting the ‘tween “I don’t want to be around my parents anymore” phase… and we love it.

Extrovert parents that feed off those interactions with their children pretty much run the parenting scene, which places undo expectations on us introvert parents. Quite frankly, I’m sick of it. I know there are other introvert parents out there that feel the same way. Perhaps its time we speak up. With summer vacation just around the corner, we need to hear that it’s okay to crave that solitude away from our kids.

Any other introverted parents out there? Leave a comment!

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New Full-Time RVing with Kids Book Now Available!

May 8, 2014

My new book is finally finished and available via Amazon! “Must Have Been Another Earthquake, Kids: A short, honest guide to full-time RV living with children” covers our three year adventure traveling the United States with our kids in tow. In the book, I cover a wide variety of topics (see table of contents below.) […]

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Being a Stay-At-Home Parent Sucks

August 22, 2013

Warning: Ninety percent of the stay-at-home-parents that read this will be publicly outraged. Seventy five percent of stay-at-home parents will secretly rejoice. Hanging out with your kids all day every day… it’s supposed to be great, right? Teaching them to play ball, video games, wrestling, ice cream, whatever. It’s supposed to be a Hallmark moment, […]

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New Adventures on the Horizon

June 20, 2013

Since Shelly and I stopped our travel and set up camp east of San Diego, our plans have been somewhat ambiguous. I got a job, we put the kids in school, and we started mma training. We didn’t really have a plan; we were going to more or less wing it. After our savings dwindled, […]

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Is Retirement Planning a Scam?

June 2, 2013

In yesterday’s post, I discussed a plan to balance making money with living a life of adventure. A reader asked about retirement planning- how does it fit in my plan? Over the last two years, Shelly and I spent a lot of time observing our fellow campground-inhabitants. Many were retired. The conversations we had more […]

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Balancing Adventure and Employment

June 1, 2013

Shelly and I get quite a few questions about our lifestyle. Specifically, how do we balance generating income with adventure? As I discussed in this article, we need money to survive. As much as I like to rant against rampant materialism, reality dictates we make at least some money. Even though poverty is an interesting […]

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Parenting Philosophy: It Doesn’t Really Matter

May 20, 2013

I like parenting philosophy debates. Why? It’s easy to get people riled up. We’re exceedingly defensive about our parenting strategies. Not surprisingly, we’re also militantly opinionated. All of us think we have the right answer to raising the perfect kid. Indeed, Shelly and I spend significant time at parks poking fun at other parents. Do […]

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Pros and Cons of RV Living with Kids

May 16, 2013

While researching solutions to cool our RV in the desert-like climate of eastern San Diego county, I came across many personal accounts of full-time RV living. A few were pretty accurate, but most seemed overly glorified. They were of the “our lives sucked, we moved into an RV, now our lives are spectacular” variety. This […]

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Cheap Cooling Methods for the RV

May 15, 2013

Since we decided to settle in the San Diego area, Shelly and I have confronted a few issues related to RV living. The most serious may be dealing with the heat. We’re residing in the East Country area about 30-40 minutes from the Ocean, which pretty much kills any cooling effect from the water. Daytime […]

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